Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Reaching to the Sun

Vacation is over, but I am doing OK.

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;
   Trees, by Alfred Joyce Kilmer, 2.13.1913

I had the pleasure to visit (again) the magnificent redwoods of California last week.  Words cannot describe, so I will just show the pictures.











The tall and short of it all.





.

This tree that fell, dated back to before 3000 BC

"What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants the friend of sun and sky;
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high,
he plants a home to heaven anigh.
For song and mother-croon of bird,
in hushed and happy twilight heard
- The treble of heaven's harmony.
These things he plants who plants a tree
."
-- Henry Cuyler Bunner, the Heart of the Tree
 

26 comments:

  1. Hello Arleen:
    What an absolutely incredible experience. And yes, the superb images do speak for themselves. Such majesty. Incredible!

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    1. Being in that park surrounded by those trees always takes my breath away.

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  2. So beautiful! I need to get back there. Glad you had an awesome trip!

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  3. The tall and short of it, indeed. How wonderful!

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  4. I love that poem by Joyce Kilmer. I was able to go to the park named after him in NC a few years ago. I have also been to the Redwoods many, many years ago. They are splendid indeed!

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  5. I'm glad you put some people in the photos, to give us the scale. Magnificent.

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  6. Ditto on the people. Lovely little girls and a humbling picture. I visited the redwoods in 1980. They haven't changed much. That was a joke.

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    1. Like everything else, they just got a little older. Unlike people though, the don't get shorter.

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  7. Those trees are awe-inspiring, aren't they? I've never seen them in person, but I imagine they do a pretty darned good job of helping put one's significance into proper perspective. (The grandkids are pretty darn awesome, too.)

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  8. Being there is like a religious experience without the preaching.

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  9. Wow! Those trees are so huge they're kind of intimidating. It almost makes it seem like this is their Earth and we're just annoying little ants wandering around...

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    1. Sometimes people are those annoying ants when they push to have these trees cut down for the money that they will makes. Thankfully many of them are protected, but that can always change.

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  10. Oh. Wow. Such an amazing place and thank you so much for sharing it. I am very, very pleased to hear that many of them are protected.
    I love the hibiscus in your header as well.

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  11. I have always wanted to go there and see them - I have heard a lot of wonderful things about it. Well now I can at least see some photos from your trip. sandie

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  12. Wow. How old are the living tress? Americans often tell me that they are envious because in the UK we have history and they don't. It's not true is it? These trees pre-date any history we have!
    Click here for Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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    1. The brochure said that some of the trees in the park are 2000 years old.

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  13. Dear Arleen, this was a lovely posting with the awesome photographs of the redwoods--especially the one looking up with the sun shining through. And the two poems were welcome additions. Thank you. Peace.

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  14. Majestic is the word for them. Beautiful.

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  15. I've always wanted to see these in person...

    Pearl

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  16. We both got to the big trees this year, then (that's some west coast we share). Love the poems you chose to compliment the photos. Such an amzing feeling to stand amongst those ancient beauties.

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  17. I came over to visit you today and am your brand new follower. I am retired too, and of course, love it. I live near the redwoods and see you admire them too.

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